Rabbi Dr. David Hertzberg

Rabbi Dr. David Hertzberg

Chinuch / Education / Ivrit B'Ivrit Curriculum

Rabbi Dr. David Hertzberg is the Principal of the Yeshiva of Flatbush Middle Division and an Asst. Professor of History at Touro College in Brooklyn, NY. While at Yeshiva University he studied under Rabbi Herschel Schachter and was a member of his Kollel. He received his rabbinic ordination from Yeshva University in 1989. He earned a Master of Arts degree in International Politics and political theory from New York University and a Doctor of Arts degree in Modern World History from St. John’s University. His research focused on intelligence sharing in counter-terrorism, diplomacy and epidemiology. At the Yeshivah of Flatbush, which is one of the premier yeshivot in the diaspora, Rabbi Dr. Hertzberg has developed various curricula focusing on an interdisciplinary approach to education. Most recently, he has developed a Tanach curriculum based on the current research in the field of behavioral economics. He has lectured widely and served as a scholar in residence on educational and leadership issues.
As a professor of history he has taught courses on Zionism, World War One, World War Two and the Holocaust, Zionism and the Rise of Modern Israel and Diplomacy. He also writes a monthly column for the Jewish Press on leadership and Torah concepts.

Latest Posts

Educational Philosophy

Although we live in an age of accountability and tests, these metrics only tell part of the story. For me, the true measure of educational success is, whether, as teachers we have succeeded in inspiring our students to want to learn more and pursue their intellectual and religious interests. In this sense, the mastery of […]

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The Power of Words: Some Thoughts for the Chagim

The Chagim provide us with opportunities to communicate with our children and to imbue with them our sacred values. By understanding and incorporating some communication tools and strategies we will increase our chances of successfully educating our children. The first thing to bear in mind is the context of the dialogue. This includes both the […]

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